Pharmacy Management Essentials

Pharmacy Managem Essentials


In planning for the second edition, we started by listening to our fellow educators, pharmacists, and students. Through surveys, e-mails, and conversations we learned about what users liked about the first edition, and what they would like to see added or changed in the future. Using what we learned, we worked with the chapter authors not only to improve the ease of use for faculty and students, but also to reflect the changes in pharmacy practice and management that have occurred in the last 4 years.


  • Every chapter has been updated to reflect the fluid nature of their respective management topic.
  • New content has been added to reflect major events in our profession, such as the implementation of the Medicare Modernization Act and subsequent addition of an outpatient prescription drug benefit (Medicare Part D).
  • New trends in the management literature and research studies are reflected in each of the chapters.
  • Four chapters have been added to the second edition. Since effective managers must also have leadership skills,


We have added a chapter on the role of leadership in management.

Medicare Part D represents probably both the biggest challenge an opportunity to pharmacy practice in the last 20 years. We have added a chapter dedicated to the management implications of this program, as well as updated other chapters to describe the impact of this program on other areas of practice.

Pharmacy practice and health care delivery inherently involves risk. We have added a chapter devoted to describing and managing the risks commonly seen in operating a pharmacy practice. The ability to take advantage of the opportunities in today’s pharmacy practice requires not only management skills but also a mindset that can think strategically about the risks and benefits of new programs. We have added a chapter on entrepreneurship to describe how having an entrepreneurial spirit can improve a pharmacy practice and to describe how entrepreneurship skills can be acquired.

This is a very exciting time for pharmacists, pharmacy students, educators, and others associated with the profession of pharmacy. A number of factors have come together to provide new opportunities for pharmacists, especially in patient care and expanded professional roles. But with the new opportunities also comes challenges, including the challenge of how to manage the personal and professional resources necessary to succeed in today’s ever-changing environment.

Educators must not only keep up with changes in pharmacy practice, but also anticipate and prepare our students for opportunities and contingencies that will arise throughout their professional careers. In our efforts to best prepare students, pharmacy management educators have increasingly had to gather teaching materials from a variety of textbooks, journals and other educational resources. This is due to the fact that many resources only focus on a specific management function (marketing, personnel, accounting and finance) or a specific practice setting (independent pharmacies, hospital pharmacies). We believed that there would be value in a comprehensive pharmacy management textbook that covered many content areas and gathered a variety of resources into one text. We also wanted to develop a resource that could be applied in a wide variety of practice settings. Our colleagues throughout the profession also agreed that a comprehensive management textbook was needed. Our desire to meet these needs sparked our interest to develop this text.

CHANGED FROM THE FIRST EDITION

In planning for the second edition, we started by listening to our fellow educators, pharmacists, and students. Through surveys, e-mails, and conversations we learned about what users liked about the first edition, and what they would like to see added or changed in the future. Using what we learned, we worked with the chapter authors not only to improve the ease of use for faculty and students, but also to reflect the changes in pharmacy practice and management that have occurred in the last 4 years.

Every chapter has been updated to reflect the fluid nature of their respective management topic. In many cases, new content has been added to reflect major events in our profession, such as the implementation of the Medicare Modernization Act and subsequent addition of an outpatient prescription drug benefit (Medicare Part D). New trends in the management literature and research studies are reflected in each of the chapters.

Four chapters have been added to the second edition. Since effective managers must also have leadership skills, we have added a chapter on the role of leadership in management. Medicare Part D represents probably both the biggest challenge an opportunity to pharmacy practice in the last 20 years. We have added a chapter dedicated to the management implications of this program, as well as updated other chapters to describe the impact of this program on other areas of practice. Pharmacy practice and health care delivery inherently involves risk. We have added a chapter devoted to describing and managing the risks commonly seen in operating a pharmacy practice. The ability to take advantage of the opportunities in today’s pharmacy practice requires not only management skills but also a mindset that can think strategically about the risks and benefits of new programs. We have added a chapter on entrepreneurship to describe how having an entrepreneurial spirit can improve a pharmacy practice and to describe how entrepreneurship skills can be acquired.

READER FIND IN THIS TEXTBOOK

This textbook is organized to reflect all of the major management functions performed by pharmacists in any practice setting. The book is divided into sections representing each function, and is further divided into chapters that detail the various components of each function.

Our experience as educators has taught us that students are the most effective learners when they are “ready” to learn. Many students selected pharmacy as a major in part from the desire to help people, but also due to their fascination and intrigue with how such small amounts of various medicinal substances have such profound effects on the body. Many of these students also believe that they only need to learn about management after they graduate, and then only if they take on a managerial or administrative position at their pharmacy. The first section of this book makes the case that management skills are important for all people and pharmacists, regardless of their position or practice setting. After establishing the need for management in both our personal and professional lives, the next four sections describe the management functions and resources that are common to all pharmacy practice settings (operations, people, money, traditional pharmacy goods and services). Chapters within each section focus on important aspects of each function or resource.

As pharmacy practice evolves from a product to a patient orientation, there are unique challenges that arise in managing the value-added services that pharmacists are developing to meet patient needs (e.g., cholesterol screening, diabetes education, drug therapy monitoring, etc.). A section of this book is dedicated to the planning, implementation, reimbursement and evaluation of these new patient care services offered by pharmacists.

Several chapters are dedicated to describing the risks inherent in pharmacy practice, and the impact that laws, regulations, and medication errors have on pharmacy management. The final section outlines the role of entrepreneurship, and how management functions are applied in specific pharmacy practice settings (independent, chain, and hospitals).

CHAPTER IS ORGANIZED

Each chapter is divided into several sections to facilitate the reader’s understanding and application of the material. Chapters begin with a list of learning objectives that outline the major topics to be addressed. A brief scenario is used to describe how a pharmacy student or pharmacist may need or apply the information described this chapter in their daily lives or practice. Questions at the start of each chapter provide direction and assist the reader in understanding what they can expect to learn.

The text of each chapter provides comprehensive coverage of the content and theory underlying the major concepts. References to the management and pharmacy literature are commonly used to provide readers with links to additional background information. Explanations and applications are also used to help readers better understand the need to master and apply each concept. Questions at the end of each chapter encourage readers to think about what they have just learned and apply these concepts in new ways.

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